Archives for posts with tag: random

“Our critique began as all critiques begin: with doubt. Doubt became our narrative. Ours was a quest for a new story, our own. And we grasp toward this new history driven by the suspicion…that ordinary language couldn’t tell it.

Our past appeared frozen in the distance, and our every gesture and accent…signified the negation of the old world and the reach for a new one. The way we lived created a new situation, one of exuberance and friendship, that of a subversive microsociety…in the heart of a society which ignored it.

Art was not the goal but the occasion and the method…for locating our specific rhythm…and buried possibilities of our time. The discovery of a true communication was what it was about, or at least the quest for such a communication. The adventure of finding it and losing it.

We the unappeased, the unaccepting continued looking, filling in the silences with our own wishes, fears and fantasies. Driven forward by the fact that no matter how empty the world seemed, no matter how degraded and used up the world appeared to us, we knew that anything was still possible. And, given the right circumstances, a new world was just as likely as an old one.”

– Waking Life, To begin again, from the beginning, Noise and Silence.

This post is to correct an error in: Under the circumstances, that I published on the first of September. I posted a quote I scribbled down while watching the movie, and I heard wrong, the true line is: “And, given the right circumstances, a new world was just as likely as an old one.” But when I read the extract I thought it worth sharing. Although I still feel my version is fitting, especially on spring day.

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“Human reason has this peculiar fate that in one species of its knowledge it is burdened by questions which, as prescribed by the very nature of reason itself, it is not able to ignore, but which, as transcending all its powers, it is also not able to answer.”

– Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804)


I found this on Derren Brown’s blog.
And all I can say is WOW, I can’t wait!

“As Christmas fast approaches, millions will opt to spare themselves the crowded high street and instead settle down in front of the computer and do their shopping there. Yet buying online has always had one key disadvantage: you have to wait. Not only that, but the inability to touch a product, try it on, feel how heavy it is or do anything else you would do on your typical high street excursion prevents online shopping being the perfect experience. But technology is now coming online that could allow you to receive your goods straight away. As the cost of 3D printing hardware begins to drop, bespoke, printable products may be about to hit the market.

Freedom of Creation is a design and research company exploring the capabilities of what, in the industry, is known as rapid prototyping. Janne Kyttanen is the company’s founder and creative director. “Imagine the potential of this for the fashion industry,” he told Digital Planet on the BBC World Service. “I can measure your body, in 3D, and I can make you perfectly fitting garments in the future without any sewing and stitching, making the needle and the thread obsolete.” His company is now producing products for companies including Asics, Tommy Hilfiger and Hyundai.

Away from the fashion world, 3D printing has many applications for the developing world. The ability to produce specially designed objects from a computer offers exciting possibilities for making vital tools in poorer, hard to reach areas. One scheme that is looking to capitalise in the technology is RepRap, short for Replicating Rapid Prototyping, which offers a cheap way of replicating objects – including the printer itself. “It’s a 3D printer that prints out a kit of parts for another 3D printer,” explained Dr Adrian Bowyer from the University of Bath.”

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